Search

How To Be Amazing At... Job Searching

Updated: May 10



Let’s try to imagine what it must be like to be a professional Actor or Entertainer where every single job is not only highly visible, but precarious too. The saying ‘you are only as good as your last gig’ just shows how challenging the job is.

In truth, we are all vulnerable when we job search. It is difficult to put ourselves out there. That is why focussing on the end goal is where we always want to be. Thinking and visualizing how great it is going to be when we land that job. As Stephen Covey (Seven Habits of Highly Effective People) says. ‘Start with the end in mind.”

Most of us need to make a living. We want a job for so many reasons; to pay the bills, to lead the life we desire, to have a home and security. Regardless of the reason, working is rarely optional.

So much of us goes into our work, but job searching can be painful experience for us because it is one of the most vulnerable time in our lives.

Let’s take a look at some things that will make searching for a job more palatable.

1. Recognize that job searching is a job in itself.

Approaching this task as a job means starting with a documented plan. Ask yourself the following questions:

  • Why am I job searching?

  • What is the perfect job for me, what does it include?

  • Where would I actually like to work and why?

  • Are there aptitude tests I should take to help me understand what I’d like to do?

  • Have I a designation that funnels me into a certain field and do I want to stay in that field?

  • Who of my contacts has a job that appeals to me?

  • Who can I talk over my process with?

2. Look at job boards and see what appeals to you.

  • What kinds of job content jumps out to you?

  • What is it about those jobs that speaks to you?

  • What special talents do you have which would work for you and for an organization?

3. Develop several resumes and cover letters.

  • Put together resumes that focus in different areas.

  • Ensure that your resume can be customized to the jobs you are applying for.

  • Always focus the resume and covering letter on how your skills can help the employer.

  • Respond to jobs that appeal to you.

Pro Tip Below:

4. Move into the proactive zone.

  • Select ten places you would like to work.

  • Study their websites and all their social media.

  • Find the person at the top or within Human Resources, or anywhere in the organization and send them your resume.

  • In your cover letter, indicate that you know they may have nothing at the moment, but should something occur—here is what you can offer.

This is you taking control of your job search. On Ep. 9 of Career Resilience, Terry Zavitz and I discussed my job search when I first started out. Knowing that I had minimal ability to go up against experienced candidates, I by-passed responding to job adverts and simply walked around town (this was before the Internet!) and looked at buildings I wanted to work in. And that is who I applied to. And that’s how I got my first job.

5. Don’t worry if you don’t hear back.

This is the way of the world and is definitely not personal. It just was not the job meant for you.

Conclusion!

I know what it’s like to job search and really want the job you’re applying for. We need that enthusiasm to carry us through the process. Therefore, we are indeed more vulnerable at this time. That’s the beauty of being human. Be that person and be amazing at work; in this scenario, the work of getting a job. You will find the role that is right for you.

Suggested Career Resilience with Jann Danyluk podcasts:

Ep 9 with Terry Zavitz, President, Zavitz Insurance

Ep. 11 with Jodi Simpson, President & Founder, CityMatch, London

Is there a topic you would like to see covered for yourself, for your friend, for your family member?

Contact me at jdanyluk@fordkeasthrc.ca.



6 views0 comments